Wednesday, 15 May 2013

Mount Fuji, Japan

Mount Fuji
Mount Fuji (富士山 Fuji-san?, IPA: [ɸɯꜜdʑisaɴ] ( listen)), located on Honshu Island, is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776.24 m (12,389 ft). An active stratovolcano that last erupted in 1707–08, Mount Fuji lies about 100 kilometres (60 mi) south-west of Tokyo, and can be seen from there on a clear day. Mount Fuji's exceptionally symmetrical cone, which is snow-capped several months a year, is a well-known symbol of Japan and it is frequently depicted in art and photographs, as well as visited by sightseers and climbers. It is one of Japan's "Three Holy Mountains" (三霊山 Sanreizan?) along with Mount Tate and Mount Haku; it is a Special Place of Scenic Beauty, a Historic Site, and has been submitted for future inscription on the World Heritage List as a Cultural (rather than Natural) Site.

In English, the mountain is known as Mount Fuji. Some sources refer to it as "Fuji-san", "Fujiyama" or, redundantly, "Mt. Fujiyama". Japanese speakers likewise refer to the mountain as "Fuji-san" (or—more rarely—"Fujiyama"). This "san" is not the honorific suffix used with people's names, such as Watanabe-san, but the on-reading of the character yama (山?, lit. "mountain") used in Sino-Japanese compounds. In Nihon-shiki and Kunrei-shiki romanization, the name is transliterated as Huzi.

Other Japanese names for Mount Fuji, which have become obsolete or poetic, include Fuji-no-Yama (ふじの山?, lit. "the Mountain of Fuji"), Fuji-no-Takane (ふじの高嶺?, lit. "the High Peak of Fuji"), Fuyō-hō (芙蓉峰?, lit. "the Lotus Peak"), and Fugaku (富岳/富嶽?, created by combining the first character of 富士, Fuji, and 岳, mountain).


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